Monthly Archive for March, 2009

Color, texture, and a making of

ma_tp_edit_v003_sor3

MAKING OF:

At the top is a version of the test with some color/texture, and simple shaders.  I’m also posting a “Making-of” so people can follow some of the integration process.  These are both roughs – there are comp, animation, and render errors, but are nonetheless interesting for us.

While I think the test got the crew used to the general pipeline/workflow, aesthestically we’re still a bit off.  At the moment, this hits closer to something from Monster House, or Polar Express.  I’d like to move more towards stop-motion, and we hope to get in some animation studies over the next few weeks, spending time with some shots from the fantastic Madame Tutli-Putli.

At the moment, the textures are mostly without detail (both in the diffuse and specular), so we’ll be working to increase some of the sophistication.  We might also spend some time with the shaders, although I’m not yet convinced we need anything more than a blinn, some fresnel, and hi-detail textures.

Sets, lighting, and motion control

ma_move_test_v0010001

We’ve now got our own motion control rig set up.  It’s based off of the last rig, which we shipped down to Studio SOI, who are using it for some exciting projects.  The test above is from a demonstration we gave to the Danish Film Institute earlier today.  There is a bit of subtle shaking in the shot, which comes from us handling the rig while the move was in progress.

Below are some recent tests of the trees Bente Laurenz Jacobsen (who is pictured below) is building for the project.  We discovered that ambient daylight is difficult to recreate indoors, so we built a large rig (like a flash umbrella), that we will be stretching cloth over and hanging above the sets for the day shots.  The shots below represent both the indoor light tests, and some outdoor shots.  The environment around the workshop provides an interesting backdrop to the shots.

There are also some shots with Nancy Munford and Karin Ørum who came up for a weekend in February to finish work on the street sets.

The stairs on the house were some of the last items that got painted – hence they’re still foam in the pictures.

3Delight & rendering

ma_tp020_comp_v007_spg0057

A more complete version of this sequence is here.

A lot of things have happened in the last month – one of which is that we’ve been sponsored by DNAsoft, developers of the renderman based 3Delight renderer. The character in the rough test above is rendered with 3Delight, which we – myself, Aske Dørge, and Nicolai Slothuus – spent about a week and some working with.  I’ve included some images below on the various stages of the process.  We took extensive set measurements to determine the camera position (although I think we’ll be trying out some image based modeling methods for the next test), shot chrome spheres, matte balls, and foreground bluescreen elements.  As always, there’s a fair bit of compositing in Shake as well as some sound mixing in Final Cut Pro.  Most of the sounds in this clip are downloaded from the great online resource freesound.org.

For the renders, we used 3Delight’s point cloud rendering methods – which meant that at small HD resolution, we could output our character with motion blur, displacements, depth-of-field, and occlusion (along with a range of other secondary passes – or arbitrary output variables) at under 1 minute a frame.  Our next test is to try and come up with a global illumination process, using our set survey data, and light emitting surfaces baked into a point cloud, and rendered using some custom shaders.  One of the great features with renderman based renderers is the simple shading language (RSL) which, in 3Delight, we can access through the Maya interface.  This means we can test and write custom shaders in the interface, before converting them to standard .sl files, which we then compile through 3Delight’s shader compile utility.

For the animation pipeline, we decided to rely on Maya’s geometry cache features, which allow us to isolate the animation and lighting pipelines from each other.  This means that the lighting scene references only the models (no rigs) and the layout, and the geometry cache imports all of the animation information.  As the animation updates, so do the lighting scenes.

We also implemented some custom spotlights, with falloff regions, and on-screen visualisation.  For this test, since we used spotlights to mimic all of our direct and indirect illumination, the falloff regions gave us more granular control over attenuation.  At some point, I may look into a linear workflow, at which point Maya’s standard decay types might be more useful (or not).